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Le TAS rejette l’appel d’Ismael Bangoura

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Le TAS  a rendu public ce lundi sa décision dans l’affaire Ismael Bangoura-FC Nantes-AL Nasr. Le joueur guinéen et le FC Nantes ont vu leur appel rejeté par le tribunal arbitral sportif qui a confirmé les sanctions infligées par la FIFA au joueur et à son club au mois de janvier 2012. 

La FIFA  avait pour rappel, interdit au club français promu cette saison en ligue 1, de recruter pendant une période d’un an et avait également condamner le joueur conjointement avec son club au payement d’une amende de 4,500,000 euros pour une rupture abusive de contrat entre le joueur et son ancien club AL Nasr de Dubaï. 
La Chambre de résolution des litiges de la Fifa avait considéré que le FC Nantes a incité le joueur guinéen à rompre d’une manière abusive son contrat avec son club.
Super a cependant déjà purgé les quatre mois de suspension qui lui avait été infligés mais reste par ailleurs astreint au payement de l’amende.
A préciser que le TAS n’a pas rendu officiel pour l’instant les motifs de cette décision et promet le faire très prochainement.
FOOT 224 : Avec le FOOT, par le FOOT et pour le FOOT.
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  1. @@@
    Asking the Insufficient QuestionsIn some ways, ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ and ‘God’s Not Dead’ aren’t all that different.
    Alissa Wilkinson/ March 23, 2015
    Image: Pureflix
    ‘God’s Not Dead’
    Asking the Insufficient QuestionsIn some ways, ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ and ‘God’s Not Dead’ aren’t all that different.
    Alissa Wilkinson/ March 23, 2015
    What do we do when we disagree with one another or with the culture at large about a movie?

    ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’

    I ve been contemplating this question in the light of what I wrote a few weeks ago especially about how form and content are equally important when we are thinking, talking, and writing about art. The movies we disagree with as a culture are the ones that have permeated our collective imaginations in one way or another. But so often, I find that when we, as a culture and Christians especially disagree about a movie, we haven t set the groundwork for our disagreement. Often it turns to shrill shouting, rather than fruitful discourse.

    Remember that movie or a TV show is both content and form (both logos and poiema, C.S. Lewis would say). I think of the content as the Wikipedia summary of the work, which includes a plot and maybe the message. The form is the shape, the contour, the things perceived by our senses the stuff you can t get from the Wikipedia summary. Hans Rookmaaker and his friend Francis Schaeffer call this the communication and the form.

    The content connects with us in our rational register. That makes sense, we say. It tells us something; it answers a question we are asking about the world; it teaches us a new concept or idea; it makes an argument for a thesis. By contrast, the film or show s form connects with us in more of an aesthetic, bodily register. We jump, or cry, or laugh, or squeal. We feel something inside. We sit forward on our seats and grip the edge of them.

    We could stay at home and read Wikipedia summaries of movies for free, but instead we go to the movies and pay for cable to feel something: happiness, sadness, terror, beauty, tension, shock.

    This is amazing, if you think about it: we actually pay money to seek out an experience that will make us sad or frightened, things we normally avoid in real life. We seek catharsis, the feeling of being made new. C.S. Lewis points out that we seem wired for this; we seek out experiences that make us feel emotions. Another way of saying this is that God made us both minds and bodies. We don t just want ideas; we want a felt desire fulfilled.

    This all gets very interesting when we start talking about popular culture, which in many ways is the common text of our time. Even though the mass audience for many shows and movies is shrinking due to the plethora of options and technologies that let us choose more individualized experiences, these mediums still form the basis for our conversations around the water cooler, on social media, at church, and in public. They have power to shift our perceptions and explore explosive ideas.

    ‘American Sniper’

    One thing I ve noticed lately is that our conversations as a culture about controversial movies and TV have a lot to do with the content with the plot points, the things that happen that we could read about and not much to do with the form. But this is a problem. We criticize a movie or TV show based on whether the content, the logos, line up with our individual commitments. Is this movie pro-war or anti-war? Was it feminist enough? Does it portray God the way we believe he is?

    Of course, it is totally valid and important for us to think and talk with one another at this level about a work. Certainly, it matters. The messages a film or TV show convey are often entertaining, and so they can slip by our barriers more easily than, say, a lecture in a classroom or a sermon. We absorb the overt messages a work conveys.

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